No Quick Fix For Asthma Treatment

One of the things my mother taught me growing up in Brooklyn was to be disciplined. Whether it be my homework, career goals or life in general. And that’s my view in treating diseases like allergies and asthma, especially asthma. You have approach it in a disciplined way; have a plan and take logical steps to deal with it. Really, there are no quick fixes for treating asthma.

Let me tell you a story. Recently, a young, 24-year old very bright woman, walked into my office. She complained of having asthma and after I asked her a few questions, she told me “all I want is a new inhaler with refills. That’s all I want.” I tried to explain to her that having asthma is complicated and requires a plan to successfully deal with the symptoms in order to lead a normal life. She responded, “I don’t need to hear all that! All I want is an inhaler with a few refills! I’ll be back in a year.”

So her response is like a number of patients who are in a hurry to get a quick fix for their problem. Sometimes a physician can’t give patients what they want. I told her, “Listen. Obviously you think you’re the doctor and telling me what I should do! When in reality I have 30 years experience treating asthma patients and you should listen to me!” With that statement she got angry and walked out.

I am very concerned about the well-being of all my patients. I tell them using an inhaler for sudden asthma attacks is no panacea for long- term asthma treatment. You need a well, thought-out, asthma action plan in writing, with your healthcare provider.

Here are some steps I advise my patients to note in their action plan when treating their asthma:

Step 1. General information: Include your name, emergency contact information, your asthma classification number and a list of triggers that my cause an asthma attack.

Step 2. An asthma action plan is divided up into three color-coded zones. 1) The green zone is the optimal zone where you want to be on a daily basis. That means you have no asthma symptoms so you continue taking long-term medications even if you are feeling well; 2 ) the yellow zone is defined as one who is experiencing symptoms and need the use of quick-relief medications to prevent the worsening of asthma symptoms; and 3) the red zone is when you experience severe asthma symptoms and should get immediate medical treatment if your symptoms do not improve.

Step 3. Use a peak flow meter. This is a device that monitors your peak flow rate–whether your asthma is getting worse, even before symptoms occur. Your best peak flow rate is the highest peak flow number you have maintained in a two to three week period. Your physician can help you to calculate it.

Step 4. Symptoms – Monitoring your symptoms is another way to use your asthma plan. They may vary during day and nighttime hours. They include: daytime symptoms (cough, wheeze or chest tightness); movement or activity level (working, exercising or playing); and nighttime symptoms (like dayttime symptoms).

Step 5. Medications. Discuss with your doctor what short-term and long-term medications are right for you depending on your symptoms.

For futher information: http://www.nycallergydoctor.com/allergy

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